4 reel Magazine

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Feel free to discuss any topic related to the Mitchell Camera. Both 35 mm and 16 mm models are welcomed here. Also consider posting topics of other major motion picture cameras that you feel are important to the development of the Mitchell Camera.

Update: You may have noticed that we have returned to just one category as opposed to dividing the forum into 7 different areas. Apparently, it was an unpopular change and returning to the old format will allow posters to find their submissions more easily.
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Neal
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Apr 02, 2018 7:08 pm

4 reel Magazine

Postby Neal » Mon Apr 02, 2018 7:14 pm

I have a Mitchell 35 mm magazine where one normal magazine mounts to the top of a special one. I have been told it was for a two strip color process the model # is 81-400

Can anybody tell me anything about it?

I can’t find anything on the internet.

Neal
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Apr 02, 2018 7:08 pm

Re: 4 reel Magazine

Postby Neal » Tue Apr 03, 2018 6:51 am

I got an answer on another forum. It is a “bipack”

mediaed
Posts: 53
Joined: Wed Apr 06, 2016 3:53 pm

Re: 4 reel Magazine

Postby mediaed » Tue Apr 03, 2018 6:19 pm

Neal,

Welcome. You have half your answer already but as to the use, it is complicated. The Bipack was something Mitchell cameras could handle because of the long shafts for the pulldowns and the registration pins. Other specially built optical printer and camera stand cameras were specifically designed to work with two film strips being used at the same time. All used Mitchell magazines simply because they were an industry standard.

Depending on the takeup side of the magazines -1) pulley style round wheels or 2) flat bar drive fixtures is whether it was most commonly used on a normal camera(1) or optical/camera stand setup (2).

There were a number of early two color processes until the mid 30's that would use two specially treated black and white film stocks in bipack magazines on regular cameras. Multicolor, duocolor are two that come to mind. They were not good for some colors like green.

Bipack was more often the province of special effects where a processed film was sandwiched with unexposed stock and used to mask our areas while shooting or to add in pre shot footage to a new scene. King Kong did most of its composites in-camera with this method. The process worked well with black and white films and not with later color film stocks. With films surface to surface, very precise effects could be accomplished as long as the film did not jamb.

Hope this quick gloss-over helps explain some more about your find.


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